Forum Posts

Praise Abraham
Jul 31, 2018
In Rural Alberta Healthcare
Bridge to Care has recently focused on providing services in rural centres of Alberta. Larger urban centres have a myriad of services readily available, however the further one travels from urban centres, the scarcer these required services become, however the need does not diminish. The vision of Bridge to Care is to reach the majority of rural Alberta by the year 2020. GEOGRAPHICAL DETERMINANTS OF HEALTH: Studies on disparities in health care confirms the view that geography is a determinant of health. People living in rural and remote communities typically have poorer health status than Canadians who live in larger centres. Canadians living in rural areas of the country are more likely to be in poor socio-economic conditions, to exhibit less healthy behaviors and to have higher overall mortality rates than urban residents. Life expectancy for people in predominantly rural regions is less than the Canadian average. While health regions with lower life expectancy tend to have small populations and cover large geographic areas, regions with higher life expectancy generally have large populations and small geographic areas. Disability rates are also higher in smaller communities, as are rates for accidents and poisoning. People living in remote northern communities are the least healthy and have the lowest life and disability-free life expectancies. DISPROPORTIONATE ACCESS: People in rural communities have poorer health status and greater needs for primary healthcare, yet they are not as well served and have more difficulty accessing health care services than people in urban centres. Access to care that urban dwellers consider routine, such as mental health services, counselling, care of handicapped children, speech therapy, physiotherapy, occupational and work therapy, support groups and so on, is either rarely found in rural areas or is improvised by the very practitioners who are in such short supply. Problems with access to health services stem from severe shortages of health care providers for even the most basic health services. Rural communities often have difficulty accessing primary health care and keeping health care providers in their towns, let alone accessing diagnostic services and other more advanced treatments. This added burden on rural physicians, nurses and administrators only adds to the current problem of recruitment and retention. People in rural communities also have the added burden of paying for the high costs of travel in order to access the care they need. This often means days or weeks away from their family and social support, as well as the added cost of accommodation and meals. Then there is the hidden cost associated with adverse outcomes caused by having to transfer patients for care. Obstetrics is an example of where the absence of local maternity services is shown to increase prematurity of newborns, hospitalizations, and costs, even if the referral hospital is of the highest standard. The density of rural communities coupled with the need to provide acute interventions in the "golden hour" of trauma, the 30 minutes for caesarean and the other time-based standards that save lives, indicate that health facilities and medical services need to be located near the people. In some cases, the delays may have no adverse effect on prognosis, but it may cause considerable anxiety. In other cases, waiting leaves people in considerable pain, diminishes capacity or increases the risk of health decline or even death. Delays in the journey can, therefore, cause anxiety, prolong suffering and, in some cases, affect outcomes following care. IMPORTANCE OF RURAL HEALTH CARE: A lack of rural services can have significant adverse effects on the local economy, it often does not realize savings, it may actually increase costs and it will further complicate efforts to attract new physicians. There is a strong link between health care accessibility and the sustainability of rural communities. According to his 2002 report on the future of health care, Commissioner Roy Romanow stated that “people’s choice of whether or not to live in smaller communities is affected by whether or not they can get reasonable access to health care.” Access to health care is an important factor in ensuring that people will be willing to live, and companies will be willing to develop industries in rural communities. Limited access to healthcare forces many rural Canadians to relocate to urban centres. Sustaining and improving rural health care is, therefore, extremely important to ensure the economic survival of rural communities allowing people to continue to live there.
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Praise Abraham
Jul 31, 2018
In Senior Care Services
A rise in abuse is one of Canada's many problems when it comes to senior care. From 2011 to 2016 there was a 148 per cent increase in reported incidents of abuse in Ontario long-term care homes. On average in 2016 six seniors were abused every day. That level of abuse is just one of the wide range of problems with elder care in Canada and there are growing calls for accountability on those issues.    - CBC News A trustworthy companion can create great impact in life!! A trustworthy and social Interaction with a companion is vital for an emotional and mental well-being of individuals. Our Services  includes: Companionship ​ Respite and overnight supervision  Supervising all daily living activities Light meal preparation and supervision Grocery list preparation & shopping Accompanying outings & appointments Home Safety Inspections Pet care assistance Hobbies and crafts assistance Interactive activities Book for Free Consultation here
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Praise Abraham
Jul 31, 2018
In Child & Family Services
Now families can experience that rest through Bridge to Care, where parents receive short-term respite while their children are engaged in fun activities tailored to their interests and abilities. We know each child has unique qualities and challenges, and we are excited to learn every nuance. If you have a child with a profound intellectual disability, there is a place for your family at Bridge to Care. Bridge to Care is a Not for Profit organization dedicated to providing support for families (without regard to race, religion or ethnicity) raising children who have special needs through short-term overnight care and activities allowing respite for their families. We want to change the face of disability services so that each family of a child with an intellectual disability has respite within reach and access to the community. Overnight respite allows parents to: Take time away and focus on their marriages. Devote more time to typical siblings. Continue their education to improve their family’s quality of life. Get ahead on work. Catch up with old friends. Best of all, let go and release any guilt or fear, because they know their child is happy and safe. Ebenezer Home celebrates children with special needs and provides relief to the extraordinary families who love them through short-term, overnight respite care. ​ We authentically love all children that come to Ebenezer Home and their families. They inspire others. Their stories impact our lives in the most positive ways, and we strive to impact theirs by providing a safe, fun place full of adventure and activities made just for them. Ebenezer Home is designed around the children, we adjust to them, not them to us. The activities are carefully and strategically planned to meet the child where they are, with the purpose of bringing normalcy to childhood. We provide cozy and comfortable sleeping areas for safe and secure overnight stays, with constant and watchful care. Book for Free Consultation here
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Praise Abraham
Jul 31, 2018
In Child & Family Services
Bridge to Care supports individuals with Autism and Asperger Syndrome from their own homes, in residential care settings and in the community. Each individual’s needs vary, some might require support with basic daily living skills, communication or social skills support and other individuals might just like a ‘break' or an alteration to their routine. In this case, Bridge to Care offers services to the individual and/or their family members. ​ Using a non-aversive and proactive philosophy, we support each individual using a person-centred approach. The level of service varies from minimal home supports, to a vast range of clinical care.  Where the need is greater, we offer interventions such as; positive behaviour programmes, support care plans, sensory integration and full occupational therapy or psychological assessments. ​ ​ At Bridge to Care, we feel it is paramount for individuals with Intellectual Disabilities to feel a sense of community inclusion.  Every individual should be given the best opportunity to reap the benefits of community involvement. However, we understand the importance of safeguarding individuals with an Intellectual Disability and protecting their vulnerability.  Our services ensure individuals are not segregated or isolated, helping each individual to strive forwards to fulfil their full potential in life.​​
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Praise Abraham
May 29, 2018
In Child & Family Services
Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are characterised by social-interaction difficulties, communication challenges and a tendency to engage in repetitive behaviours. However, symptoms and their severity vary widely across these three core areas. Taken together, they may result in relatively mild challenges for someone on the high functioning end of the autism spectrum. For others, symptoms may be more severe, as when repetitive behaviours and lack of spoken language interfere with everyday life.
What Are the Symptoms of Autism? content media
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Praise Abraham
May 29, 2018
In Rural Alberta Healthcare
DISPROPORTIONATE ACCESS: People in rural communities have poorer health status and greater needs for primary healthcare, yet they are not as well served and have more difficulty accessing health care services than people in urban centres. Access to care that urban dwellers consider routine, such as mental health services, counselling, care of handicapped children, speech therapy, physiotherapy, occupational and work therapy, support groups and so on, is either rarely found in rural areas or is improvised by the very practitioners who are in such short supply. Problems with access to health services stem from severe shortages of health care providers for even the most basic health services. Rural communities often have difficulty accessing primary health care and keeping health care providers in their towns, let alone accessing diagnostic services and other more advanced treatments. This added burden on rural physicians, nurses and administrators only adds to the current problem of recruitment and retention. People in rural communities also have the added burden of paying for the high costs of travel in order to access the care they need. This often means days or weeks away from their family and social support, as well as the added cost of accommodation and meals. Then there is the hidden cost associated with adverse outcomes caused by having to transfer patients for care. Obstetrics is an example of where the absence of local maternity services is shown to increase prematurity of newborns, hospitalisations, and costs, even if the referral hospital is of the highest standard. The density of rural communities coupled with the need to provide acute interventions in the "golden hour" of trauma, the 30 minutes for caesarean and the other time-based standards that save lives, indicate that health facilities and medical services need to be located near the people. In some cases, the delays may have no adverse effect on prognosis, but it may cause considerable anxiety. In other cases, waiting leaves people in considerable pain, diminishes capacity or increases the risk of health decline or even death. Delays in the journey can, therefore, cause anxiety, prolong suffering and, in some cases, affect outcomes following care. IMPORTANCE OF RURAL HEALTH CARE A lack of rural services can have significant adverse effects on the local economy, it often does not realise savings, it may actually increase costs and it will further complicate efforts to attract new physicians. There is a strong link between health care accessibility and the sustainability of rural communities. According to his 2002 report on the future of health care, Commissioner Roy Romanow stated that “people’s choice of whether or not to live in smaller communities is affected by whether or not they can get reasonable access to health care.” Access to health care is an important factor in ensuring that people will be willing to live, and companies will be willing to develop industries in rural communities. Limited access to healthcare forces many rural Canadians to relocate to urban centres. Sustaining and improving rural health care is, therefore, extremely important to ensure the economic survival of rural communities allowing people to continue to live there.
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